Fondly: Two NovellasFondly: Two Novellas

**Voted one of the Best Books of 2013 by Daniel Levin Becker at Salon.com**

“It takes some audacity to print a cover like this, an audacity that is adeptly matched by the prose inside.” – Rain Taxi

“Winnette’s writing delivers an emotional punch followed by a discreet wink.” – Foreword Reviews

“Two separate exercises in absurdism…Gainesville moves like a serial killer in a getaway car…in contrast to In One Story, the Two Sisters’ episodic cartoon form…where the situations are an endless, whimsical adventure to read.” – Metazen

Learn more about Fondly

The Law of Strings

“Gillis’s is an intellectual voice. The thought and research he lavishes on his stories ooze from the text, giving his work a Richard Powers-like fascination with the nuances of science and technology.”
The Los Angeles Review

“Beautiful, slightly strange, surreal little stories … some so poetic it makes your teeth hurt to read them, they’re so sweetly perfect.” – Insatiable Booksluts

“Recommended for readers for whom the conventional just won’t do – and who aren’t afraid of heights.”
– Books, Personally

Learn more about The Law of Strings

Kino

“A fast, complex, exhilarating roadster ride through history and time…Kino is an intoxicating Euro-brew, written with enormous skill and dedication.”
— Frederick Barthelme

“This is an elegant book, wrapping the core of a thriller in ideas that play with literary and semiotic conventions…Jürgen Fauth has a confident touch and is worth watching in the future.”
— David Marshall, reviewer, San Francisco Book Review

Learn more about Kino

Three Ways of the Saw

“‎Mullins, in a fresh and unforgettable voice and writing style, has reached across the human condition, exposing the sinew that holds us together, even while it hopelessly, inevitably shreds.”
Foreword book-of-the-year finalist

“A brooding, raw, rustbelt, jazzy, Motown energy informs the sensibility and sound of this writer, fuels his prose, and gathers this collection into a compelling whole.”
– Stuart Dybek, author of I Sailed With Magellan

“Matt Mullins deserves to be read. He will become an important part of our literary world. – Grady Harp

Learn more about Three Ways of the Saw

An End to All Things: Stories by Jared Yates Sexton

“Marginalized, ignored middle-class Midwesterners; compassionately-created characters…frustrated by situations beyond their control…Sexton is successful in earnestly capturing their futile grasps at agency.”
Publishers Weekly

“The minimalist style of Sexton’s prose, like that of Carver and Hemingway, belies the complex relationships that comprise [t]his interesting reflection on changing roles and values in our society…an excuse for a party.”
The Los Angeles Review

“[With] invigorating writing that avoids a purely nihilistic tone…and truly explores mankind’s sense of the unknown, Sexton pushes through the monotonous bullshit to true beauty.”
The Literary Man

Learn more about An End to All Things

The Tall Tale of Tommy Twice: A Novel by Nathan Leslie

“[A] whimsical story full of magic and exaggeration worthy of Mark Twain or Washington Irving.”
– Charles Rammelkamp, Chamber Four

“A laugh-riot, page after page of yuks, high-minded absurdity, and Ionesco-worthy wackiness.”
– Lee K. Abbott, All Things, All at Once: New & Selected Stories

“One of the truly exciting writers of his generation.” — Richard Burgin, founder and editor, Boulevard

“Bizarre, sad, cruel, funny, horrible, [and] always surprising–Nathan Leslie channeling The Brothers Grimm.”
— Lynda Schor, Seduction

Learn more about Tommy Twice

The Bee-Loud Glade by Steve Himmer

“Himmer’s debut novel evokes Chekhov, Thoreau, Fowles, and others…” – Publishers Weekly

“A thoughtful, funny, tender novel full of memorable characters and heart-stilling moments.” – Pank Magazine

“An allegorical novel that seems eerily contemporary. Thoreau meets Ballard, meets Huysmans and many more.” – Tom McCarthy, author of Remainder and C

“[A] fascinating crossroads in American Literature…” – Plumb

Learn more about The Bee-Loud Glade


Nazareth, North Dakota and Apostle Islands, a farcical retelling of The New Testament by Tommy Zurhellen

“Universally timeless and contemporary … If Jesus needs new PR, this is one imaginative possibility.”
Publishers Weekly starred review of Apostle Islands

“[A]n epic tale…” – New York Journal of Books

“[A]n excellent book from a promising new voice in literature.”
– Small Press Reviews on Nazareth, North Dakota

Learn more about Nazareth, North Dakota Learn more about Apostle Islands

Fight for Your Long Day by Alex Kudera

Fight for Your Long Day by Alex Kudera

“Th[is] marvelous debut is worthy of a place on the same bookshelf as Lucky Jim and A Confederacy of Dunces…Kudera is the real deal.” – Ron Rash, award-winning author

“A fast-paced story, told with humor at every turn … the kind of novel one learns from and rallies behind. Eyebrow-raising and wry, Kudera’s take on the ivory tower certainly makes it look less pearly white.” – Foreword Reviews

Learn more about Fight for Your Long Day

The Great Lenore by J M Tohline

The Great Lenore by JM Tohline

“Beautiful in the same way that J.D. Salinger’s books are beautiful.” – New York Journal of Books

“A page-turner that introduces the literary world to an author with a clear and profound appreciation for the American literary canon.” – Small Press Reviews

“The young writer’s talents are so apparent that the reader has little interest in reading a second-rate Fitzgerald, preferring a first-rate Tohline, instead.” – The Los Angeles Review

Learn more about The Great Lenore

The Snow Whale by John Minichillo

The Snow Whale by John Minichillo

“Wonderfully inventive … a delightful tale that is subtle and outrageous in equal measure.”
Publishers Weekly

“A funny debut novel … wry, dry, pure hilarity all around.” – Los Angeles Times

“Part satire, part mythic romance, The Snow Whale, like its namesake, is a unique creation.”
– Jaimy Gordon, author, Lord of Misrule

Learn more about The Snow Whale

Tracks by Eric D. Goodman

Tracks by Eric D. Goodman

“[A] compelling novel.” – Foreword Reviews

“A most cunningly crafted tale.” – Madison Smartt Bell, author of All Souls’ Rising

“[A] born storyteller.” – New York Journal of Books

“An exciting talent.” – Thomas Steinbeck, author of Down to a Soundless Sea

Learn more about Tracks

FROM THE PUBLISHER’S DESK: CHANGES ARE GONNA COME

AtticusMADISON, NJ — Many exciting things are happening at the press and they are a true north departure from business as usual. When I conceived Atticus Books five years ago, I maintained that we would focus on debut novelists whose compelling narratives and memorable main characters channeled the spirit of Harper Lee and Atticus Finch.

Atticus has stayed true to that mission and published the full-length works of more than a dozen new and emerging writers. In addition, we have produced books by previously published authors such as Steven Gillis (The Law of Strings), Colin Winnette (Fondly), and Nathan Leslie (The Tall Tale of Tommy Twice).

In all Atticus now has thirteen novels in its catalogue, plus five story collections, one memoir, and one anthology, a collective history of the American literary magazine (Paper Dreams).

Since 2010 we have gradually earned a reputation as a quirky fiction house, a moniker that we wear with pride, but it doesn’t encompass the many poems, essays, book reviews, and mixed media presentations our editors have curated at Atticus Review, our weekly online journal.

In 2015 I embrace the idea of Atticus becoming a publisher that defies description. Not because we’ve lost sense of our place in the small press universe but rather because we now have the desire to set forth in a new path, one that we will carve out with intent and purpose.

This summer Atticus will embark on five major initiatives that reflect a fundamental shift from our publishing house’s original mission:

1) We will publish our first memoir.

2) We will carve out a portion of the Atticus Review website to create a digital sports lit magazine and call it More Than Sports Talk, using Flipboard as our platform.

3) We will cover the 2016 presidential campaigns, primaries, and election: Atticus On The Trail.

4) We will create a digital scrapbook of stories and artifacts from our American veterans: Tales from the VFW.

5) We will broaden our mission to become truly global.

When I look at these initiatives, I notice a common thread. The first four are far removed from the pages of make-believe. In fact, each area of coverage is entrenched in the headlines of reality. However, none is far removed from what Atticus set out to do from Day 1:

Support writers whose inventive work we want others to read.

Support writers whose inventive work we want others to read.

This will be our mantra.

Belief Is Its Own Kind of Truth, MaybeOur first memoir, Belief Is Its Own Kind of Truth, Maybe (Aug. 4, 2015), is a young mother’s arduous journey to find her birth mother.

People often ask what attracts me to a specific title. What distinguishes one work from another? There’s no science to my selection method, but Belief engages me on a few levels. First and foremost, I’ve wanted to publish a book by Lori Jakiela since I first became acquainted with her writing. She has a voice that resonates in my soul and reminds me of other writers (e.g., Anne Lamott) whose powerful, humanistic narratives have stood the test of time.

I also dedicate the publication of Belief to my daughter, Gwynne, whom my wife and I adopted at age two from an orphanage in Romania in April 1999. Belief is a book that speaks to me as an adoptive parent. I’ve always accepted that Gwynne, now eighteen years of age, someday may want to trace the roots of her own life and heritage.

Finally, my hope is that Belief may offer a comforting companion to readers who struggle to cope with the universal challenges of self-identity. May you never feel alone.

Like Writing? Like Sports?

More Than Sports Talk is an Atticus Review offspring dedicated to raising the level of discourse about sports. Our purpose is to honor the rich tradition and cultural significance of sports by harnessing the power of creative sportswriting.

What We Plan to Do:

• Deliver narrative threads and storylines that reach far outside the foul lines and well beyond the playing field.
• Publish artfully told works by writers who exhibit a skill for off-center storytelling, colorful human interest features, and compelling nonfiction.
• Profile the present and past lives of people involved in sports including athletes and non-athletes at every level.
• Celebrate the history and diversity of sports.

More Than Sports Talk is an online community of writers, general interest readers, and sports fans who are interested in the role that sport plays in our lives, whether it is instrumental or minimal, inspiring or exploitative, unifying or divisive.

MTST embraces the ambition of reintroducing the fine art of sportswriting into the mainstream. Our goal is to produce literature that examines the many factors that compel us to compete and drive us to be such fiercely loyal fans or detractors. MTST aspires to entertain, amuse, and provoke. It is a tip of the hat and a left hook to the side of the wide wonder of sports and its intersection with commerce, culture, and humanity.

Sports fans, meet Joe Lucido. Joe is our new editor at More Than Sports Talk, Atticus Review's digital sports lit…

Posted by Atticus Books on Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Submit your work here. Moreover, follow @MoreThanSportsT on Twitter to watch this monthly pub unfold.

Atticus on the Trail What Would a Born-and-Bred Hoosier Gonzo Journalist Do?

I’ve always fantasized about what it might be like to be Hunter S. Thompson. I now to get to live vicariously through Atticus author Jared Yates Sexton (An End to All Things).

Shortly after the AWP Conference dust settled, Jared approached me with the idea of covering the ’16 presidential campaign and election, and I bit. I mean, I really bit hard. Jared is an amazing writer and Atticus Review is grateful to present his ongoing series of bullshit-detecting dispatches from the Capitol. Seriously, “Atticus On The Trail” is going to kick ample derriere these next several months. You really need to pay attention. Your entertainment quota–not to mention our children’s future–may just depend on it. To keep up with our campaign coverage on Twitter, follow @AtticusPolitics.

Tales from the VFW

Tales from the VFWThe main goal of this next project is to travel the country and listen to our veterans, preserving the amazing stories they have to tell.

Tales from the VFW is a digital scrapbook of stories and artifacts from our American veterans, woven together by the team of award-winning novelist and U.S. Navy vet Tommy Zurhellen, photographer Chris Motta, and publisher Dan Cafaro. The project can be described as a “moveable feast” of memories, recorded from veterans all across the country.

We know we’re not the only folks committed to preserving the stories of our vets; we welcome everyone to join our Tales from the VFW project. Do you have a veteran in your life with a great story to tell? Are you a vet who would like to share your experiences? Contact Dan with your story. If it’s a vet’s tale, it’s worth telling, and who knows? Tommy and Chris may come to a VFW near you to hear it firsthand.

Be a part of a uniquely American story and support Tales from the VFW!

~ DC 4/21/15 (updated 6/30/15)

Booking it Along the California Coast: A Book Tour / Road Trip Across the Pacific Coast

Installment 7 of Eric D. Goodman’s Travel Essay Series Do You Know the Way to San Jose? I was born in San Jose, so as the old song goes, I know the way. It probably maintains much of the same spirit described in the song. Compared to larger cities like San Francisco and LA, it […]

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Booking it Along the California Coast: A Book Tour / Road Trip Across the Pacific Coast

Installment 6 of Eric D. Goodman’s Travel Essay Series Hills and Valleys I guess everyone knows about the streets of San Francisco. The up and down of the streets over the hills is something you may know about, but don’t get a feel for unless you’ve actually driven them, or taken a trolley car up, […]

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