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Loving Lit Mags: Nathan Leslie

paper dreams frontWhile we fiction houses love a good book, the writing in literary magazines holds the possibility of discovering snippets of newfound talent and mainstay art.

Literary magazines are like a good party host. They connect people–readers to new authors and authors to new readers. They give us a taste and leave it up to us to ask for a number or try and hit it off.

In August, we publish Paper Dreams: Writers and Editors on the American Literary Magazine, but before we make history, it is only polite to introduce you to the literary magazines that impress us the most, publications that have turned us into better writers and voracious readers.

Nathan Leslie, author of The Tall Tale of Tommy Twice, shares a list of literary magazines to party with.

 

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Fiction International

Run out of San Diego University, Fiction International publishes fiction, nonfiction, intermediate prose, and visual art emphasizing formal innovation and progressive politics.

 

Nathan: “I like the edgy work.”

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Scribble

A print magazine from Baltimore, Scribble was born in 1997 as a grad school project. Since then it’s published poetry, fiction, and creative non-ficiton, from all over the world. Check out their sleek black and white, sideways layout.

Nathan: “Great magazine.  Really supportive of local authors such as yours truly.”

 

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Boulevard Magazine

Nathan: “One of the best magazines out there.  I’m honored that they published me a few times.”

Out of St. Louis University, Boulevard has been around for 28 years and publishes fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. You can read excerpts for free on their site here.

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North American Review

Nathan: “Ditto.”

The oldest literary magazine in the country, The North American Review is published four times a year with poetry, fiction, and non-fiction.

 

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About Atticus Books

Atticus Books is a fiery multimedia press based in Madison, N.J. We specialize in genre-busting literary fiction and compelling narratives that feature memorable main characters. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we receive no nourishment from Uncle Sam, nor do we eat small children for breakfast. We do nurture the creative minds and bruised egos of starving writers worldwide.

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