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Warning: This Book Contains a Dragon

Armageddon, TexasMADISON, NJ — A kid named Kid. A dog named Dog. A superhero named Ben Wolf. A sort of wizard named Hyatt.

A self-proclaimed king named Pike. An otherworldly monster called Samson.

Together these characters inhabit Armageddon, Texas (Nov. 4, 2014 release), the post-apocalyptic, outrageously comical creation of Tommy Zurhellen.

After experiencing a romp through these pages of mythology, scripture, and classic literature, you will see why Tommy Z has been dubbed “the crown prince of zany and the prime minister of zip.”

At the end of the world, there will be a boy, a girl, and a very large serpent.

Armageddon follows the warm reception of Tommy’s first two IPPY gold award-winning novels in The Messiah Trilogy: Nazareth, North Dakota (2011) and Apostle Islands (2012), each published by Atticus Books.

Publishers Weekly complimented Tommy for his “masterful dialogue” in Nazareth, North Dakota, and called Apostle Islands “both universally timeless and contemporary … If Jesus needs new PR, this is one imaginative possibility.”

Now with Armageddon, Texas, Tommy breaks new storytelling ground as he weaves two ancient tales: the biblical account of Genesis and the medieval pagan poem, Beowulf, into a work that is so infectious it will tickle your funny bone and make you second-guess your use of the English language!

Armageddon, Texas: A Novel
Book 3 of The Messiah Trilogy
By Tommy Zurhellen
Publication release: Nov. 4, 2014
ISBN: 978-0-9915469-1-6
List price: $14.95
Fiction/Literary Fiction
250 pages

Tommy ZurhellenABOUT THE AUTHOR
Tommy Zurhellen was born in New York City. He is the two-time award-winning author of The Messiah Trilogy and currently teaches writing at Marist College in upstate New York. He also is co-host of the podcast Fiction School.

About Atticus Books

Atticus Books is a fiery multimedia press based in Madison, N.J. We specialize in genre-busting literary fiction and compelling narratives that feature memorable main characters. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we receive no nourishment from Uncle Sam, nor do we eat small children for breakfast. We do nurture the creative minds and bruised egos of starving writers worldwide.

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